Birds of Prey stamps are available for pre-order now. Four special items introduced by Singapore Post

Birds of Prey stamps are available for pre-order now. Four special items introduced by Singapore Post
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Birds of Prey, also known as raptors, hunt and feed on other animals. On September 21th 2016 Singapore will release a set of four stamps that feature four species of birds of prey.

StampNews.com invites our readers to appreciate these four philatelic items that will allure your attention with their original design. Let`s get acquainted with each stamp more detailed.

The stamp with denomination 1st local is featuring a Changeable Hawk-eagle (Nisaetus cirrhatus).

The changeable hawk-eagle or crested hawk-eagle (Nisaetus cirrhatus) is a bird of prey species of the family Accipitridae. It was formerly placed in the genus Spizaetus, but studies pointed to the group being paraphyletic resulting in the Old World members being placed in Nisaetus (Hodgson, 1836) and separated from the New World species.

The stamp with denomination 70 cents is featuring a White-belied Sea Eagle(Haliaeetus leucogaster).

The white-bellied sea eagle (Haliaeetus leucogaster), also known as the white-breasted sea eagle, is a large diurnal bird of prey in the family Accipitridae. Originally described by Johann Friedrich Gmelin in 1788, it is closely related to Sanford's sea eagle of the Solomon Islands, and the two are considered a superspecies. A distinctive bird, the adult white-bellied sea eagle has a white head, breast, under-wing coverts and tail. The upper parts are grey and the black under-wing flight feathers contrast with the white coverts. The tail is short and wedge-shaped as in all Haliaeetus species.

The stamp with denomination 90 cents is featuring a Brahminy Kite(Haliastur indicus).

The brahminy kite (Haliastur indus), also known as the red-backed sea-eagle in Australia, is a medium-sized bird of prey in the family Accipitridae, which also includes many other diurnal raptors, such as eagles, buzzards, and harriers. They are found in the Indian subcontinent, Southeast Asia, and Australia. They are found mainly on the coast and in inland wetlands where they feed on dead fish and other prey. Adults have a reddish brown plumage and a contrasting white head and breast which makes them easy to distinguish from other birds of prey.

The stamp with denomination $1,30 is featuring a Black-wingend Kite (Elanus caeruleus).

The black-winged kite (Elanus caeruleus) is a small diurnal bird of prey in the family Accipitridae best known for its habit of hovering over open grasslands in the manner of the much smaller kestrels. This Eurasian and African species was sometimes combined with the Australian black-shouldered kite (Elanus axillaris) and the white-tailed kite (Elanus leucurus) of North and South America which together form a superspecies. This kite is distinctive, with long-wings, white, grey and black plumage and owl like forward-facing eyes with red irises.

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