The last stamps form the series dedicated to Bicentenary of the Kingdom of the Netherlands was unveiled

The last stamps form the series dedicated to Bicentenary of the Kingdom of the Netherlands was unveiled
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PostNL has been presenting a tribute to the bicentenary of the Kingdom of the Netherlands with special stamps over the course of three years. StampNews.com got to know that the final stamp in the series was issued on 2 March 2015, thereby completing this unique series.

These stamps depict the territory of the Kingdom of the Netherlands over the past two centuries. For decades PostNL has been issuing stamps in commemoration of the political formation of the country, independence, Royal anniversaries and other historic events.

The foundation for the current form of the Kingdom of the Netherlands was laid from 1813-1815. That is why PostNL has drawn attention to this historic milestone with three stamp issued from 2013-2015. In this final year, the focus is on the territories during the reign of King William I (in 1815) and at the time of the oath-taking of King Willem-Alexander in 2013. The early stamps depicted the return of the Prince of Orange in 1813 and the celebration of the Bicentenary of the Constitution (1814-2014). Both stamps were issued exactly 200 years later.

Kings leave their mark on stamp

The theme of the inauguration presented designer Vanessa van Dam with the challenge of having to focus on the major differences. "The greatest difference concerned the territory to which both monarchies were associated. The map on the two stamps makes clear, for example, that the Southern Netherlands were part of the Kingdom in 1815. I have also included the currently most important land reclamation.

The Zuiderzee was not yet impoldered in 1815", explains Van Dam. I could clearly show the different sizes of the Kingdom in 1815 and 2015 in the design by literally having both kings leave their mark on their territory. This refers to the elegant signature of King William I and the Great Seal of King Willem-Alexander. "The result is a stamp with a third layer on top of the marks left by the two monarchs", adds Van Dam.

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