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The beauty of firearms from bygone centuries. Weapons’ ornaments appeared on 4 stamps by Romfilatelia

The beauty of firearms from bygone centuries. Weapons’ ornaments appeared on 4 stamps by Romfilatelia
Written by editor-in-chief
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Romfilatelia introduces into circulation the postage stamp issue “Weapons' Ornaments” an issue meant to bring to collectors the beauty of firearms from bygone centuries. Romanian weapons are the symbol of brevity, courage and security. They form an integral part of Romanian culture.

StampNews.com invites our readers to appreciate these greatly decorated stamps!

The stamp with the face value of Lei 2.50 illustrates a Persian origin gun from the first half of the 18th century, with a length of 46.5 cm and 15 mm calibre. The piece is made of three materials: steel, that was cast, moulded, engraved and gilded; cast silver, moulded, laminated, cut and wire spun, engraved and polished; turned wood, inlaid, plated and polished.

The stamp with the face value of Lei 4.50 reproduces the image of a flintlock pistol of Italian origin from  the first half of the 18th century, with a length of 54.5 cm  and 16 mm calibre. The piece is made of four materials: cast steel, hammered, engraved, silver plated and etched; turned and finished wood; cast silver, wire spun and filigreed, gilded and carved; carved coral.

The stamp with the face value of Lei 8 represents a flintlock pistol of Turkish origin in the first half of the 18th century, with a length of 50.5 cm and 15 mm calibre. The piece is made of three materials: cast steel, hammered, engraved, gilded and carved; cut and polished wood; cast silver, fretted, gilded and carved.

The stamp with the face value of Lei 15 depicts another Turkish origin pistol from the first half of the 18th century, with a length of 49.5 cm and 16 mm calibre. The piece is made of four materials: cast steel, hammered, engraved, gilded and carved; turned wood, carved and polished; drawn and polished silver; cast brass, rolled and pressed.

The pieces portrayed on the postage stamps belong to the National Peles Museum's heritage.

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