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Beautiful UnescoWorld Heritage Sites in Israel. Three special stamps introduced by Israel Post

Beautiful UnescoWorld Heritage Sites in Israel. Three special stamps introduced by Israel Post
Written by editor-in-chief
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Israel is a rich land that can also boast by its beautiful sites, many of which entered the famous list created by UNESCO. To underline the importance and the uniqueness of these places Israel Post has released three special items that StampNews.com is excited to introduce to our readers' attention.

Let's appreciate the original design of these bright stamps together!

NahalMe'arot Caves stamp

Four caves are carved into the mountain on the southern slope of Mount Carmel, at the entrance to the NahalMe'arot Caves. Archeological excavations conducted at the site from 1928 to the present have discovered evidence of human existence near and inside the caves over hundreds of thousands of years. Among the many findings were remnants of houses, various stone tools, jewelry, bones of animals used for food and graves.

Bet She’arim Necropolis stamp

Rabbi YehudahHanasi, leader of the Jewish people in the late 2nd century CE, was buried at his behest in the cemetery in the town of Bet She'arim in the western Jezreel Valley. Many others subsequently asked to be buried near the final resting place of the admired leader. Dozens of burial caves were dug into the hillside and on the outskirts of the town. Jews were brought from all over Eretz Israel and even from faraway lands to be buried there. The hundreds of epitaphs found in the caves provide information about the Jewish lifestyle in the 3rd and 4th centuries CE.

Maresha and Bet-Guvrin Caves stamp

Residents of the city of Maresha, in the southern Judean plain, carved many spaces beneath their homes into the soft chalk bedrock upon which the city was built. These spaces served as water reservoirs, agricultural production facilities, storage rooms, pigeon raising, burial caves and more. After Maresha was destroyed in the 1st century BCE a new city called Bet-Guvrin was constructed nearby. In the Byzantine period, the townspeople carved bricks out of the chalk in deep, bell-shaped caves.

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