News

Innovative and incredibly beautiful Fish skin stamp. A special item released by Faroe Islands Post

Innovative and incredibly beautiful Fish skin stamp. A special item released by Faroe Islands Post
Written by editor-in-chief
26 votedvote

StampNews.com is glad to inform our readers that for the first time ever Faroe Islands Post has issued Fish skin stamps – Incredibly beautiful and patterned with almost metallic colour tones. Let’s appreciate the original design of this philatelic item together!

These beautiful stamps are with skin of cod caught in Faroese waters, supplied by fish exporter Nevið in Runavík, tanned by Atlantic Leather in Iceland and printed by Cartor in France.

The Atlantic cod (Gadus morhua) is usually about one meter in length, but can grow to 2 meters and weigh up to 96 kilos. It can reach an age of 25 years and is found on both sides of the Atlantic, from Novaya Zemlya in the Barent Sea, Spitsbergen and Jan Mayen down to the Bay of Biscay, in the North Sea and the Baltic Sea to the east. It is commonly found in the waters around the Faroe Islands and Iceland, as well as Greenland - and from Labrador in the north to North Carolina in the south.

Cod is generally sandy brown, its back and sides are yellowish-green, with grey or brown spots and a white lateral stripe running along its sides. The belly is white or greyish-white. However, it can have other colour variations depending on habitat, f. ex. dark brown or maroon if it lives among kelp.

Cod is popular for its delicate flesh. This is especially true of Faroese cod, which is fatter and not as mealy or dry as cod in other places.

Tanning of fish skin an ancient art although it has not been common in the post-war period. The quality of fish leather will of course vary from species to species, but properly treated skin of cod, salmon and lumpfish is often stronger than ordinary cowhide.

The size of fish skins have made them especially well-suited for producing smaller items, such as  shoes, bags, purses and watchbands. Sewn together, they can also be used in the garment industry and to upholster furniture. Today's designers are getting more and more aware of fish skins‘ practicality and beauty - and use them, in addition to the items mentioned above, for a number of few articles, f. ex. jewellery, belts, book binding and photo collages.

The uses of the Faroe most abundant material, fish, can only be limited by our imagination. And right now Posta strikes a blow for the forgotten treasure found in the versatile uses of fish products by issuing unique stamps with the most fascinating cod skin patterns.

This beautiful stamp is with real skin of cod caught in Faroese waters, supplied by fish exporter Nevið in Runavík, tanned by Atlantic Leather in Iceland and printed by Cartor in France.

About the author

editor-in-chief

1 Comment

Leave a Comment

error: Alert: Content is protected!