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Jewish Festivals 2015 – Childhood Memories stamps are to be released

Jewish Festivals 2015 – Childhood Memories stamps are to be released
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StampNews.com hurries to inform that Israel Post is ready to release special stamps to celebrate the main Jewish Festivals 2015. The stamps issue has the title "Childhood Memories" and is scheduled to be put into circulation on the 2d of September.

Rosh Hashanah

Rosh Hashanah is the Jewish New Year. The Biblical name for this holiday is Yom Teruah or the Feast of Trumpets. It is the first of the High Holy Days or "Days of Awe" which usually occur in the early autumn of the Northern Hemisphere. Rosh Hashanah is a two-day celebration, which begins on the first day of Tishrei. Tishrei is the first month of the Jewish civil year, but the seventh month of the ecclesiastical year.

The day is said to be the anniversary of the creation of Adam and Eve, the first man and woman, and their first actions toward the realization of humanity's role in God's world. Rosh Hashanah customs include sounding the shofar (a hollowed-out ram's horn) and eating symbolic foods such as apples dipped in honey to evoke a "sweet new year".

Yom Kippur

Yom Kippur is probably the most important holiday of the Jewish year. Many Jews who do not observe any other Jewish custom will refrain from work, fast and/or attend synagogue services on this day. Yom Kippur occurs on the 10th day of Tishri. The holiday is instituted at Leviticus 23:26 et seq.

The name "Yom Kippur" means "Day of Atonement", and that pretty much explains what the holiday is. It is a day set aside to "afflict the soul", to atone for the sins of the past year. In Days of Awe, I mentioned the "books" in which G-d inscribes all of our names. On Yom Kippur, the judgment entered in these books is sealed. This day is, essentially, your last appeal, your last chance to change the judgment, to demonstrate your repentance and make amends.

Sukkot

Sukkot, a Hebrew word meaning "booths" or "huts", refers to the Jewish festival of giving thanks for the fall harvest. It also commemorates the 40 years of Jewish wandering in the desert after the giving of the Torah atop Mt. Sinai. Sukkot is celebrated five days after Yom Kippur on the 15th of the month of Tishrei, and is marked by several distinct traditions. One, which takes the commandment to dwell in booths literally, is to erect a sukkah, a small, temporary booth or hut. Sukkot (in this case, the plural of sukkah) are commonly used during the seven-day festival for eating, entertaining and even for sleeping.

Sukkot also called Z'man Simchateinu (Season of Our Rejoicing), is the only festival associated with an explicit commandment to rejoice. A final name for Sukkot is Chag HaAsif, (Festival of the Ingathering), representing a time to give thanks for the bounty of the earth during the fall harvest.

Childhood memories of the annual festivals return each year like the prayer Jewish people repeat again and again, 'Like waves that break unceasingly, into the vast sea…'

Jewish Festivals 2015 – Childhood Memories stamps are to be released

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